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FACING OCEAN PLASTIC POLLUTION


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FACING OCEAN PLASTIC POLLUTION


 

A massive amount of plastic trash ends up in our oceans every year. The ocean currents have formed five gigantic slow moving whirlpools where the plastic collects, nicknamed Vortex.

 

Recent studies indicate that at least 40 million pounds of plastic has accumulated and is floating in the north pacific ocean alone. The majority of the plastic debris remains in the Vortexes, however a significant percentage of it washes onto our coastlines daily.

 
 
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After sunlight photo-degrades the plastic into small pieces, aquatic life and sea birds mistake these fragments for food and ingest it.

 

While its difficult to know exact figures, a 2012 report from WSPA indicates that between 57,000 and 135,000 whales are entangled by plastic marine debris every year in addition to the inestimable – but likely millions – of birds, turtles, fish and other species affected by plastic marine debris.

 

New studies show that ingested plastic damages the internal organs of fish. This raises the question about the safety of our seafood.

 
 
 
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If we fail to clean up the plastic and stop the continued pollution of the oceans, we are facing the potential extinction of many sea life species and the interruption of the entire eco-system.

 

We also risk the health of anyone who eats seafood.

 
 
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“We’re the big brained animals on this planet and we’re putting everything in danger because we don’t really understand the planet as a whole, and human beings, through our consumption and our waste, are messing with the system.”

Graham Hawkes

 
 
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MISSION


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MISSION


 

SCIENTISTS, ENVIRONMENTALISTS, CREATORS AND BRANDS TEAM UP TO SOLVE THE IMPOSSIBLE MISSION.

 
 

The big Challenge is to retrieve the floating plastic out of the open sea. The majority of the plastic has broken down into small pieces 1/4” inch or smaller. The plastic trash is scattered over massive areas and is not easily visible or collected. The center of a Vortex where the plastic concentration is highest is constantly moving. It is difficult to collect the plastic without harming fish and other sea life. Only a minority of the plastic is on the surface, the majority sinks to the ocean floor. But a huge part of the plastic debris is washing up on beaches where it can be collected relatively easily and without complex technology by locally organized clean up organizations.

 
 

This pillar of the project focusses on the key objective of The Vortex Project: Save as many animals as possible by cleaning off plastic from coastlines and oceans. Keep plastic in use and recycle plastic trash into upcycled production materials. The bigger challenge is the collection of plastic debris that has broken down into tiny pieces without harming sealife. The technology for such a retrieval process is not yet in place, but a variety of inventions is in development and testing. The Vortex Project supports R&D in this field with a think tank.

“I want to be plastic!” Andy Warhol’s phrase expresses the fascination for plastic that we all share. Plastic is perfect. It is sleek, comes in any color possible and looks stunning when brand new. Also, it comes in all these different types which meet specific usage requirements. That makes it very hard to replace with ecological senseful alternatives. Parallel to the cleaning efforts, The Vortex Project is educating on the responsible use of disposable plastic and funds an r&d think tank to develop alternative materials, filter systems and new recycling systems.

Today, a sexy product can be the most efficient advertising for a cause. It is the best proof of concept for a new technology and gives consumers who care the decision to do the right thing. Therefore the main communication tool of The Vortex Project are beautiful designed products, that are made in a new and more sustainable way and carry the story of ocean plastic pollution into the world. All products made with ocean plastic associated with The Vortex Project contribute to the funding of this initiative.

 

DISRUPT THE CYCLE.

 

“Creativity is the key to saving creation from our darker side and the key to a future of ecological harmony between humanity and the diversity of wondrous species we share this planet with.”

Captain Paul Watson

 
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THE INITIATIVE


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THE INITIATIVE


 

Clean up shorelines and oceans, boost new technologies and turn ocean plastic into smart consumer products to create funding and awareness.

 
 

The Vortex Project is a non-for profit initiative and was founded in 2013 by eco-material innovator Bionic, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, and Parley - for the Oceans. The project is based on the belief that human economy must be harmonized with the eco system of nature in order to make a serious impact.

 

Since its founding, a variety of environmentalists, scientists, artists, entrepreneurs, creative companies and non-for-profit organizations have joined the cause. The advisory board includes Plastic Pollution Coalition, Ocean Alliance, Mare, Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, Alba Group.

 

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Wear the responsibility for the oceans.

Pharrell Williams

 
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OFFICIAL PARTNERS


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OFFICIAL PARTNERS


 

WE ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE LAUNCH OF OUR FIRST COLLABORATION SUPPORTING THE CAUSE. GSTAR RAW PARTNERS UP WITH BIONIC YARN TO PRESENT A COLLECTION MADE FROM OCEAN PLASTIC.

 

RAW FOR THE OCEANS

 

 
 
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HAPPY OCEANS! HAPPY LIFE!

PHARRELL WILLIAM CURATES A COLLABORATION BETWEEN BIONIC YARN AND G-STAR TO TURN OCEAN PLASTIC INTO DENIM

Pharrell Williams, Creative Director of Bionic Yarn, announces ‘RAW for the Oceans’, a long-term collaboration between denim brand G-Star RAW and Bionic Yarn. Together they launch the first collection made with recycled plastic from the oceans.

On Feb8, in the setting of the American Museum of Natural History, the partners presented The Vortex Project, an initiative by Parley for the Oceans in collaboration with Bionic Yarn and Sea Shepherd Conservation Society to remove plastic from the oceans and recycle it. RAW for the Oceans is a G-Star collection that will be made with Bionic Yarn created out of plastic recycled from the oceans. The collaboration is a long-term creative exploration, where both parties joined forces to innovate denim and to make a serious impact against plastic pollution. In addition to the joined seasonal collections, G-Star will integrate Bionic Yarn material into its product lines where possible.

 

Musician and entrepreneur, Pharrell Williams has been the Creative Director of Bionic Yarn since 2009. On the collaboration he says: “Working with G-Star was an obvious choice because they have a legacy of pushing the boundaries of fashion and denim forward. Bionic Yarn is  a company built around performance, denim is the perfect category to show the world what our product can do. Everyone has jeans in their closet"

Driven by its design philosophy ‘Just the Product’, G-Star focuses on the continuing reinvention of modern craftsmanship, 3D denim innovation and new materials. G-Star Strategy Director Thecla Schaeffer says: “G-Star has always been driven by innovation, and by integrating Bionic Yarn into our collection we’re taking the next step in creating denim for the future. We’re very excited about the long-term goals of this collaboration and to have Bionic as our business partners.”

The RAW for the Oceans collection will be available at selected G-Star RAW stores, and online from August 15th.

 
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JOIN THE MOVEMENT


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JOIN THE MOVEMENT


 

Please reach out to us if you want to join the movement, start your own initiative or collaboration project, or just want to learn more about it.

 

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